Tag Archives: time management

The Benefits of a Personal Retreat

A couple of weeks ago, I spent two days in West Virginia for an individual business retreat. I used this time to review my goals and progress, make necessary adjustments, and work on some strategic goals that I find challenging to complete during my everyday work.

It can be hard to find time to really focus and get meaningful work done when you are surrounded by distractions, interruptions, and a calendar booked with meetings.

Sometimes you need to slow down to speed up.

Pausing for an hour (or a couple of days) to recalibrate and get clarity on where you are going and what you need to do to get there can actually speed up your progress. When I start to feel overwhelmed,  it’s usually an indication that I don’t have clarity about what I need to be working on. Slowing down to create clarity allows me to refocus my energies and increase my productivity.

Watch the video below to hear about my retreat in West Virginia and how a personal retreat can help you to refocus and get better results. I almost canceled this scheduled retreat because of some big life changes we have going on (I share some of that in the video), but I honored my commitment, and the results were awesome.

Once you’ve watched the video, I’d love to hear from you. How do you build time into your schedule for strategic and meaningful work? Share your tips in the comments below!

The Effective Executive

I recently conducted a survey of high level leaders and found that their number one challenge was managing time and increasing productivity. Have you ever left work at the end of the day and wondered what you actually accomplished? Operating in reactive mode is a very common challenge leaders face. 

 I recently wrote an article that was featured in Credit Union Management Magazine entitled “The Effective Executive: Strategies for Leading Your Team so You Can Focus on the Big Picture”. This article highlights five ways to increase productivity, engage your employees, and lead at a higher level.

 Below are the five strategies:

Define key result areas. These are the three to five functions only you can do in your job. Once you get clear on your key result areas, plan your month, week and day around these high-leverage activities.

Shift your focus: people first, then things. Your success as a leader depends on getting things done through other people. Spend most of your time developing and coaching your staff and less time on operational areas.

Design the relationship. Be purposeful in designing the relationship you have with each employee. Ask each employees questions to find out their individual needs and tailor your leadership style to each person so you can garner the best performance from each employee.

 Use the coach-approach. The cornerstone of coaching is to be more inquisitive rather than directive. Ask more questions and listen instead of telling your employees what to do. Challenge your employees to think critically and develop solutions on their own.

 Build in accountability. Set clear expectations and deadlines, and build accountability systems into your individual and team meetings to encourage accountability. Be explicit about who will do what and by when. Employees are more likely to naturally follow through when they know there is a system in place to check progress.